Speaker from the Jacob Wetterling Resource Center discusses safety with seniors

Ms.+Alison+Feigh%2C+a+former+classmate+of+Jacob+Wetterling+who%C2%A0was+kidnapped+from+his+hometown+of+St.+Joseph%2C+Minnesota+in+1989%2C%C2%A0speaks+with+BSM+seniors+about+safety.
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Speaker from the Jacob Wetterling Resource Center discusses safety with seniors

Ms. Alison Feigh, a former classmate of Jacob Wetterling who was kidnapped from his hometown of St. Joseph, Minnesota in 1989, speaks with BSM seniors about safety.

Ms. Alison Feigh, a former classmate of Jacob Wetterling who was kidnapped from his hometown of St. Joseph, Minnesota in 1989, speaks with BSM seniors about safety.

Ginny Lyons

Ms. Alison Feigh, a former classmate of Jacob Wetterling who was kidnapped from his hometown of St. Joseph, Minnesota in 1989, speaks with BSM seniors about safety.

Ginny Lyons

Ginny Lyons

Ms. Alison Feigh, a former classmate of Jacob Wetterling who was kidnapped from his hometown of St. Joseph, Minnesota in 1989, speaks with BSM seniors about safety.

JinLee Gunvalson, Staff Writer

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With many students decided or deciding on colleges for next year, one big issue that often goes unconsidered but is going to arise in the upcoming years is safety. Because it is a concern for not only the parents but the students as well, BSM hosted a speaker from the Jacob Wetterling Resource Center for seniors on Tuesday, March 20 in the chapel.

Ms. Alison Feigh, a former classmate of Jacob Wetterling who was kidnapped from his hometown of St. Joseph, Minnesota in 1989, has been speaking at schools and teaching others about child abuse and protection for over a decade. “Remain positive and keep people informed,” Feigh said.

The Jacob Wetterling Resource Center has two main values they follow: It’s a kid’s job to be a kid, and it’s the responsibility of adults to see every child as someone who may need their help and protection and children are never responsible for their own victimization; they often lack the understanding of exploitation, and therefore never “go willingly.”

The talk was mainly focused on how it is the students’/adults’ job to be responsible for their own actions but also knowing that help is available if needed. While this was the main part of the talk, something different is taken away based on the person individual view, “One thing I will take away is to always be aware of what is going on,” senior Conner Sager said.

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