Trap shooting is the fastest growing sport in Minnesota – COVID might make it more popular

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Photo Courtesy of John Porisch

Senior captain Max Hoffman holds up his “50 Patch”.

Claudia Scherer, Editor

This spring, the Benilde-St. Margaret clay target team will embark on their 6th season of trap shooting––the fastest growing sport in Minnesota. Although they missed their season last year, the team got a chance to practice some shooting this fall and is excited for the season.

Teacher and coach Mr. John Porisch has been with BSM trap since its creation in 2015 when two parents––Greg Grazzini and Rich Bray––brought the sport to the school. He believes that trap is perfect for the given circumstances. Not only were members already socially distanced before COVID, but their competitions are separate and schools simply send in scores. “We are always standing more than 6 feet apart when we compete. Clay Target really is a great sport for our current situation,” Porisch said

The team still has to make some restrictions, though. These include moving the shooters through faster and not using the clubhouse they have used in previous years. “We don’t utilize the clubhouse where free popcorn is usually distributed. We ‘pre-squad’ all of the groups so there is less time waiting in groups for a time to shoot,” Porisch said.

Senior member and captain Charles Hansen has been on the team since his sophomore year when he came to BSM. Although bummed out by losing the season last year, Hansen is happy to still have one year left. “It was pretty sad for me… but it was not my last year so I still have this year,” Hansen said.

Porish is excited for the upcoming season and can’t wait to get some time in at the club. “Clay Target ‘triggers’ nearly all of the senses at once. It has a unique rhythm unlike any other sport, from the sounds and smells to the crushing of clays when you have a ‘hit’ … we shoot at a beautiful club, overlooking a small lake that is tucked in between some beautiful hardwood hills,” Porisch said.