A family affair: teachers with children who attend BSM

Sophmore+Andrew+Lyons+and+his+dad%2C+science+teacher+Mr.+Bob+Lyons%2C++work+in+class+together.

Lexi Basil

Sophmore Andrew Lyons and his dad, science teacher Mr. Bob Lyons, work in class together.

Blake Mesenburg, Staff Writer

Inside the walls of Benilde-St. Margaret’s, many students walk the halls alongside their parents. This year, 20 students have parents teaching them and their classmates at BSM.

Depending on the student, there can be a lot of different responses as to how they feel about having their parent as a teacher. Senior Ronan Brew has had his mom, Mrs. Maura Brew, as a teacher for two different school years. Starting in Honors English 9 and again in AP Literature, he has gotten familiar with having his mother as a teacher. “It became natural over time and I eventually did not notice a difference between having my mom as a teacher and having any other teacher,” Brew said.

Although some students may believe it would be nice to see their parents every day at school,  there are a few disadvantages that come with this, including the familiarity others around the school have with you. Sophomore AJ Pauly has become a very familiar face at BSM with both his father Mr. Ken Pauly and mother Ms. Anne Marie Dominguez teaching at the school. “Every teacher knows who I am during the first day of class because of my parents. If I am messing around and am off task during class, then my parents find out right away and I get in trouble,” Pauly said.

All students can relate to the fact that as teenagers, there are times when you want to see your parents and times when you do not. In his early years of high school, Senior Louis Hyde felt seeing his mother in the hallway was less than ideal. “I used to get embarrassed when I saw my mom walking down that hallway past me,” Hyde said.

Every teacher knows who I am during the first day of class because of my parents. If I am messing around and am off task during class, then my parents find out right away and I get in trouble.”

— AJ Pauly

From the students’ point of view, having a mother or father as a teacher can also be very helpful for their learning. They have a better understanding of the style of teaching and have a better ability to stay on top of things in the class. “If I did not understand something that she was doing in class or I forgot the homework, I could ask my mom at home for help,” Hyde said.

Another issue the students face on a daily basis at school is how they should greet a teacher who is also a parent. There is no standard as to what a student should call their parents during class, and it varies depending on the student. “I sometimes refer to her as a mom while other times I call her Mrs. Brew. When I have a question I usually do not address her as anything, I just ask the question,” Brew said.