Students and teachers share their pet peeves

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Students and teachers share their pet peeves

Senior Ava Smithmier struggles with teachers not updating PowerSchool learning.

Senior Ava Smithmier struggles with teachers not updating PowerSchool learning.

Bridget Yazvec

Senior Ava Smithmier struggles with teachers not updating PowerSchool learning.

Bridget Yazvec

Bridget Yazvec

Senior Ava Smithmier struggles with teachers not updating PowerSchool learning.

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Everyone has their own list of pet peeves. They create frustration and irritation, and many most likely revolve around school. Students have their list of pet peeves towards teachers, and teachers have their own list of pet peeves towards students.

They certainly don’t try to, but teachers often create environments that cause their students to form pet peeves about their teaching methods.

Many students feel that it is a teacher’s responsibility to grade assignments and tests and put them into PowerSchool as soon as possible––otherwise students find the teacher to be irresponsible.  “[My biggest pet peeve is] when teachers wait like a month to put the grade in the gradebook,” sophomore Dominic Vogel said.

Before grading ever comes into play, students feel that a teacher should only expect an assignment to be completed if it is posted on PowerSchool Learning because otherwise they have no way of knowing what the teacher expected them to complete. “When teachers don’t put homework up [on PowerSchool Learning] it’s very frustrating” sophomore William Thompson said.

Giving instructions is obviously essential in order to teach a lesson, but many students feel that teachers give confusing instructions, which results in annoyance. “Yeah, I don’t know if it’s just me, but I am usually still confused after a lesson, especially in science,” sophomore Frida Fortier said.

Teachers often don’t allow their students to leave their classroom at any time, and this angers students because it restricts them from going to the bathroom. “My biggest pet peeve is when teachers say that you can’t leave the classroom to go to the bathroom or whatever,” senior Izzy Erickson said.

Teachers, shockingly, have just as many, if not more, complaints about students. Most of the pet peeves that teachers have revolve around distractions in class-or not spending time in the room altogether.

According to the teachers’ responses to the Knight Errant survey, the most irritating things students do is spend time on their laptops and ignore the lessons. This pet peeve leads to more issues down the road and further frustration. “My biggest pet peeve is when people talk when I, or other people, are already talking and then ask me two minutes later about something they just missed,” math teacher Ms. Joanie Sauer said.

The slightly less popular complaints were far more entertaining. Loud noises made the top of the list in multiple fashions. About twenty percent of the responding teachers cited “dog whistles” as one of their biggest grievances. An even more specific issue was “a specific student making horrible whooping noises,” engineering teacher Ms. Kirsten Hoogenakker said.

Students and teachers do understand the other side’s objections to some degree. “I think students have a legit gripe with things not being graded yet… taking time allotted into consideration,” Sauer said.

“I understand when it’s the teacher’s responsibility to teach and kids just won’t listen,” senior Anna Carr said.

Even with open dialogue, students and teachers alike may have to face the fact that pet peeves will never truly be eliminated. “I checked every box on the survey because everything is annoying,” math teacher Mr. Max Johnson said.

 

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