Best throwback songs of recent decades

2016 had some impactful music releases across all genres, but it’s important to acknowledge the artistic genius of some throwback tunes.

Soulja+Boy+was+an+icon%2C+let+alone+a+beacon+of+hope+for+the+2000%27s+music+scene.

Photo Courtesy of Interscope Records

Soulja Boy was an icon, let alone a beacon of hope for the 2000's music scene.

What is your favorite throwback song?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

1. The Real Slim Shady by Eminem

Released at the beginning of the millennium, Eminem’s hit from his album “Marshall  Mathers LP” is still blasted out of speakers and headphones today. “Slim Shady” was another one of the aliases the artist used along with “Eminem” and “Marshall Mathers.” The melody is the perfect ending to the 90s and ensures its longevity. The lyrics are just humorous enough to make it perfect to sing along to in the car with friends.

2. Crank That (Soulja Boy) by Soulja Boy

The 2007 song from the album “Souljaboytellem.com” is no doubt a great song. It manages to conquer the charts with its addicting beats. Much like Vanilla Ice, Soulja Boy was able to write hits at the age of sixteen. However, it wasn’t until he turned seventeen that the song topped the Hot 100. Even so, this made him the youngest solo artist to write, perform, and produce a chart topper. It went on to spend seven weeks at number one in the U.S.A.

3. Umbrella by Rihanna and Jay-Z

Rihanna and Jay-Z’s collaboration in the album “Good Girl Gone Bad” calls for supporting each other during rough times. Despite the serious underlying message of the 2007 hit, the artists ensure that the song is enjoyable to listen to and upbeat. The melody is the perfect back up to Rihanna’s and Jay-Z’s vocals.

4. Ice Ice Baby by Vanilla Ice

This infamous throwback song took to the streets and stores in 1990. Vanilla Ice originally wrote this song at the age of sixteen. It was at that young age he made the notable mistake of taking a sample from Queen’s song “Under Pressure,” which put him under legal pressure. The famous melody may have been stolen from a different song, but the original, entertaining lyrics are as original as they come.

5. Low (ft. T-Pain) by Flo Rida

Flo Rida’s poppin’ hit was released in 2007 on his album “Mail on Sunday” and went on to be featured in the 2008 film Step Up 2 The Streets. The repetitive rhymes and fresh beats just add to the let loose atmosphere of the song.

6. Pon de Replay by Rihanna

Rihanna is back at it again with the chart-topping song “Pon de Replay,” which translates to “play it again” in the language Bajan—the dialect of Barbados—a nod to Rihanna’s home. It was released in 2005 on her album “Music of the Sun.” Love for this song is undoubtedly based on the unique, bilingual lyrics that flow perfectly with the innovative melody.

7. Party in the U.S.A. by Miley Cyrus

This is the lead 2009 single from Miley’s first ever extended play, or EP, “Time of Our Lives.” The song that is known as the perfect example of the “old Miley” includes some autobiographical references about her move from Tennessee to Los Angeles.

8. Fergalicious by Fergie

This song was released in 2006 on Fergie’s first solo album, “The Duchess.” She also had one of the other Black Eyed Peas members, Will.I.Am, featured on the track. Fergie was even able to win Favorite Female Artist at the 2007 American Music Awards when she performed this song along with “Big Girls Don’t Cry” and “Clumsy.”

9. Stacy’s Mom by Fountains of Wayne

While Fountains of Wayne may not be topping charts today, back in 2003 they were on top of the world with their song, Stacy’s Mom. It reached number one on iTunes’ Most Downloaded Songs chart and was even nominated for a Grammy Award in 2004 for Best Vocal Pop Performance. The guitar base to the melody makes it the perfect early 2000s song and supply the vocals with an ideal backdrop.

10. Yeah! by Usher

Released in 2004 on his album “Confessions,” this throwback hit became number one on the chart until it was beaten by Usher’s next hit “Burn.” It’s also known as one his many successful collaborations with Atlanta rapper, Ludacris. The song is flawlessly set up for a party atmosphere with the early 2000s base and intense vocals.