Super Bowl ads objectify and offend

Kale Walch, staff writer

Between the unclothed women, simulated sex, “cramming it in the boot,” and sexual jokes every other commercial, this year’s Super Bowl ads were overwhelming, in the least.

Since its television premier in 1967, Super Bowl commercials have become an integral part of the great American celebration. The content of these commercials also served as a sort of moral gauge for the nation.

Back then, commercials were innocent; advertisements were for soap, deodorant, soda, and afro lotion, for example. Moral standards were still present.

America has since shifted into an unrecognizable shadow of what it used to be. The commercials of this year’s Super Bowl reflect this complete departure from America’s moral roots.

This year, gross sexual jokes were nearly universal, appearing in many commercials. You may remember the Teleflora commercial with Faith Hill. Here, Hill’s studio producer was writing a Valentine’s Day message for his girlfriend.

Upon being told by Hill to “tell her how you feel,” the man responds, “Dear Kim, your rack is unreal.” The average American man probably loved this and went to buy a large bouquet of Teleflora flowers right away.

Now I may be stranger than most, and I may feel like I’m 58-years-old, but I hated this commercial. Such blatant degradation of women would have been shunned, rejected even 20 years ago.

Another “hit” commercial this year featured the Mini Cooper. In this ad, the car was part of a game show where contestants had to take various items and “cram it in the boot” of the Mini Cooper.

The host began by asking the eager contestant if he had ever “crammed it in the boot,” to which the contestant looked down in silence. Immediately the player proceeded to take various items, a robot, an extra-long sub sandwich, and a bee hive for example, and “cram it in the boot” (the trunk) of the Mini Cooper.

This commercial “advertised” the excessive trunk room of the Mini Cooper. There was clearly a more suggestive message here; an obscene sexual reference that doesn’t need to be explained.

Finally, near the end of the game, an ambush: suddenly, Kim Kardashian and a chiseled young man were doing what appeared to be “intimate team stretches,” making suggestive sounds. Quite frankly, it was simulated sex; Kardashian went on to say: “You were amazing, the best I ever had.”

This blatant show of immorality was the closest thing to a porno that they could have put on TV. Why would advertisers do this? Sex sells; in this case, shoes. This serves to prove how disgusting our country has become.

In addition to the absence of morals in the approved commercials, perhaps the only moral and positive commercial was banned. This prohibited commercial advertised the website, “Lookup316.com,” which is, of course, in reference to John 3:16, perhaps the most famous verse in the Bible.

Fox considered this ad offensive to some of their viewers, which is odd because with all the sex and violence in the other commercials, you wouldn’t think they cared about offending people.

If the Super Bowl is a gauge of America’s moral condition, the gauge is at zero. America is less than immoral; it is amoral, with no moral standard, restraints, or discernment between right and wrong.