Staff Editorial: Francis I explores progressive ideals

When Pope Francis I was elected last year, few knew what to expect. The little known cardinal was recognized mostly for being a man for the people, but exactly how that would translate to his papacy remained to be seen. Despite this initial uncertainty, Pope Francis I has quickly displayed exactly how he plans to lead the Catholic Church. His progressive ideals will push the church to be a more modern and relevant institution to modern Christians.

Pope Francis has made his issues with the church’s recent endeavors very clear. He takes specific issue with the practice of condemnation instead of love for one’s neighbor. “Who am I to judge them if they’re seeking the Lord in good faith?” he asked in an interview in regards to homosexuality.

One of Pope Francis’ strong suits is his appeal to the historic doctrine of the church. By attracting a more diverse group of people, Pope Francis is returning to the universal roots of the church. His simplistic explanation of his ideas makes Catholicism as easy to understand as Jesus made it. Jesus, as the most monumental progressive of his time, aimed to make the church as universal as possible. The pope’s recognition of these ideals is absolutely necessary to the church’s mission.

We have to find a new balance; otherwise even the moral edifice of the church is likely to fall like a house of cards, losing the freshness and fragrance of the Gospel”

— Pope Francis I

The broader message behind Francis’ new ideology is one of progression. “We have to find a new balance; otherwise even the moral edifice of the church is likely to fall like a house of cards, losing the freshness and fragrance of the Gospel,” Pope Francis said in a later interview. This progressivity is exactly what the church requires as they push further into the twenty-first century. Without said progression, the church will not grow and flourish.

At their very core, Jesus’s teachings were liberal and progressive. His doctrine transcended the teachings of his time. The pope’s new declaration of beliefs long ago, are more profound in the context of the church than in society in general. These teachings more closely align with the original meaning of Catholicism. Furthermore, there is a positive outcome to this; Catholics who condmn others on ever evolving social issues could possibly see Pope Francis’ claims as a reflection of what they should become.

In the broad spectrum that is society and the church’s coexistence today, Pope Francis I has clearly stood for a more progressive and anti-bureaucratic church. Pope Francis is quickly becoming the church’s modern leader, one which it so desperately needs.