Junior High welcomes international French visitors

Many+students+from+Versailles%2C+France%2C+came+to+the+Junior+High+so+that+they+could+experience+Minnesota.+This+involved+participating+in+activities+such+as+bowling+and+hockey.
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Junior High welcomes international French visitors

Many students from Versailles, France, came to the Junior High so that they could experience Minnesota. This involved participating in activities such as bowling and hockey.

Many students from Versailles, France, came to the Junior High so that they could experience Minnesota. This involved participating in activities such as bowling and hockey.

Michael Koch

Many students from Versailles, France, came to the Junior High so that they could experience Minnesota. This involved participating in activities such as bowling and hockey.

Michael Koch

Michael Koch

Many students from Versailles, France, came to the Junior High so that they could experience Minnesota. This involved participating in activities such as bowling and hockey.

Kayla Farrey, Staff Writer

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BSM recently welcomed a group of French exchange students for a week who have traveled from the city of Versailles, southwest of Paris. Benilde-St. Margaret’s families hosted the French students ranging from 10 to 14 years old. BSM had the pleasure of welcoming nine students: Aymeric Auvray, Clémence Billebault, Jean-Baptiste Boucquicaux, Matteo Bray, Paul Fabre, Agathe Lemap-Blanquet, Fanny Perrin, Alicia Quintin, and Emma Roger.

The students experienced the best of Minnesota in 10 days. Students and their host families visited the Science Museum of Minnesota, went bowling, played hockey, and participated in many other exciting activities. “[The] Timberwolves game and the Mall of America have been my favorite [activities]” Boucquicaux said.  

The students also commented on the unique learning styles and kind teachers BSM had to offer. Their school in Versailles is more accommodating to children but is smaller in size than Benilde-St. Margaret’s. Schedules at their schools are quite different; in France, they have over an hour and a half for lunch and no school on Wednesday afternoon. The classroom etiquette also differs. “In France, the teachers switch rooms while the students stay in the class,” Roger said.  

The children missed their parents but were not homesick. “We have loved everything about the experience so far. This is my third time in the US. I want to come back every summer,” Billebault said.

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